Stewart Brand

Inquire About This Speaker
Stewart Brand photo

Futurist, Technology Visionary and Pioneering Environmentalist; Former Editor, Whole Earth Catalog; President, The Long Now Foundation

Biography

Since he emerged in the counter-culture sixties, Stewart Brand has been a force in the world for giving access to the information needed to make the planet a better place.

Mr. Brand is the president of The Long Now Foundation, established to creatively foster long-term thinking and responsibility in the framework of the next 10,000 years. He leads a project there called Revive and Restore, which seeks to bring back extinct animal species such as the passenger pigeon and woolly mammoth.

Brand is well known for founding, editing and publishing the “Whole Earth Catalog” (1968-85), which received a National Book Award for the 1972 issue. In 1984, he founded The WELL (Whole Earth ‘Lectronic Link), a computer teleconference system for the San Francisco Bay Area. It now has 11,000 active users worldwide and is considered a bellwether of the genre.  He was also a co-founder and managing director of Global Business Network, a scenario strategy consulting business, where he worked with leading companies and public institutions on their futures.

Brand has been a member of the Board of Trustees of the Santa Fe Institute, an interdisciplinary center studying the sciences of  complexity, since 1989. He received the Golden Gadfly Lifetime Achievement Award from the Media Alliance, San Francisco in the same year. He was a founding member of the Board of Directors of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, an organization which supports civil rights and responsibilities in electronic media, and is an acting advisor to Ecotrust, the Portland-based preservers of temperate rain forests from Alaska to San Francisco.

Brand is the author of many pioneering books including “SALT Summaries: Condensed Ideas About Long-term Thinking” (Long Now Press, August 2011), and “Whole Earth Discipline: An Ecopragmatist Manifesto” (Viking Adult, October 2009), in which Stewart tackles controversial issues such as nuclear power, genetic engineering, and geoengineering. He has advocated nuclear power as a responsible strategy to address power demand in the face of the stark reality of global warming. His seminal essay on this topic, entitled “Environmental Heresies”, appeared in the MIT Technology Review in May 2005.  Other books include “The Clock Of The Long Now” (Basic Books, April 2000), “How Buildings Learn: What Happens After They’re Built” (Penguin, October 1995), “The Media Lab: Inventing the Future at MIT” (1987), and “Two Cybernetic Frontiers: Both Sides of the Necessary Paradox” (1974). It had the first use of the term “personal computer” in print and was the first book to report on computer hackers.

Videos

Books & Research

The SALT Summaries: Condensed Ideas About Long-term Thinking

(Long Now Press, August 2011)

Whole Earth Discipline: An Ecopragmatist Manifesto

(Viking Adult, October 2009)

The Clock of the Long Now

(Basic Books, April 2000)

How Buildings Learn: What Happens After They're Built

(Penguin, October 1995)

Whole Earth Catalogue

(Whole Earth, Fall 1968)

Articles

Digital Is Just Getting Started

Future Tense logo

Should We Use Cloning to Save Endangered Species?

June 4, 2014

Should we use cloning to save endangered species?

New York Times logo

The Mammoth Cometh

March 2, 2014

Bringing extinct animals back to life is really happening — and it’s going to be very, very cool. Unless it ends up being very, very bad.

Wired logo

Futurist Stewart Brand Wants to Revive Extinct Species

August 17, 2012

This summer it was announced that the WELL, a revolutionary online community founded nearly 30 years ago, had been put up for sale by its current owner, web magazine Salon.

Prospect magazine logo

How Slums Can Save the Planet

January 27, 2010

Sixty million people in the developing world are leaving the countryside every year. The squatter cities that have emerged can teach us much about future urban living

NPR logo

Stewart Brand's 'Ecopragmatism'

October 21, 2009

In the 1960s, Stewart Brand became one of the country’s first and most famous champions of a new ecological awareness.

Biography

Since he emerged in the counter-culture sixties, Stewart Brand has been a force in the world for giving access to the information needed to make the planet a better place.

Mr. Brand is the president of The Long Now Foundation, established to creatively foster long-term thinking and responsibility in the framework of the next 10,000 years. He leads a project there called Revive and Restore, which seeks to bring back extinct animal species such as the passenger pigeon and woolly mammoth.

Brand is well known for founding, editing and publishing the “Whole Earth Catalog” (1968-85), which received a National Book Award for the 1972 issue. In 1984, he founded The WELL (Whole Earth ‘Lectronic Link), a computer teleconference system for the San Francisco Bay Area. It now has 11,000 active users worldwide and is considered a bellwether of the genre.  He was also a co-founder and managing director of Global Business Network, a scenario strategy consulting business, where he worked with leading companies and public institutions on their futures.

Brand has been a member of the Board of Trustees of the Santa Fe Institute, an interdisciplinary center studying the sciences of  complexity, since 1989. He received the Golden Gadfly Lifetime Achievement Award from the Media Alliance, San Francisco in the same year. He was a founding member of the Board of Directors of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, an organization which supports civil rights and responsibilities in electronic media, and is an acting advisor to Ecotrust, the Portland-based preservers of temperate rain forests from Alaska to San Francisco.

Brand is the author of many pioneering books including “SALT Summaries: Condensed Ideas About Long-term Thinking” (Long Now Press, August 2011), and “Whole Earth Discipline: An Ecopragmatist Manifesto” (Viking Adult, October 2009), in which Stewart tackles controversial issues such as nuclear power, genetic engineering, and geoengineering. He has advocated nuclear power as a responsible strategy to address power demand in the face of the stark reality of global warming. His seminal essay on this topic, entitled “Environmental Heresies”, appeared in the MIT Technology Review in May 2005.  Other books include “The Clock Of The Long Now” (Basic Books, April 2000), “How Buildings Learn: What Happens After They’re Built” (Penguin, October 1995), “The Media Lab: Inventing the Future at MIT” (1987), and “Two Cybernetic Frontiers: Both Sides of the Necessary Paradox” (1974). It had the first use of the term “personal computer” in print and was the first book to report on computer hackers.

Speech Topics

City Planet

A billion people now live in squatter cities, with two billion more coming. The world’s rampant urbanization and squatter cities are major news, and surprisingly good news at that, both economically and environmentally.

The Long Now

Taking the long view on the impact of humans on the planet. Once you have the perspective of decades and centuries, problems that seemed unsolvable become solvable, and pressing urgencies fade away to expose what is crucial.

The Greening of Nuclear Power

Climate change is so catastrophic environmentally that everything must be done to head off its worst effects, including expanding nuclear power.

The Future of the Environmental Movement

Science-attentive Greens will reverse direction on urbanization, population, genetic modification, and nuclear power.

How Buildings Learn

Buildings never stop changing. Some do it well and become loved. Some do it badly and get worse over time. The difference is intelligent design and intelligent use.

Articles

Array

Books & Research

Array

Recommendations

“Likely one of the most original and important books of the century… a mindbending exploration of what humankind can and must do to retain the mantle of civilization.”

—Paul Hawken, Environmentalist, Entrepreneur, and Author

“Ominous and exhilarating.”

—Edward O. Wilson, Pulitzer Prize winning author, Biologist, Professor, Harvard University

“Perhaps its greatest achievement will be to reframe this global crisis as an opportunity for civilisational regeneration.”

—Brian Eno, Musician, Composer, Environmentalist

Similar Speakers

Array

A-Z Name

Brand, Stewart

Intro Video

Video Thumbnail
Stewart Brand: The dawn of de-extinction. Are you ready?