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Episode 12: The Power of Virtual Reality with Jeremy Bailenson

| Minds Worth Meeting, Technology, The Future | No Comments

Virtual reality is very close to becoming a major element of society. With its ability to alter perceptions of the real world, what implications does the emerging technology have for the future of business and society? Minds Worth Meeting chats with VR pioneer and Stanford University Professor Jeremy Bailenson, who discusses the possibilities, opportunities and dangers of using this new medium.

New to Stern

Erik Brynjolfsson

Erik Brynjolfsson is the foremost authority on technology’s effect on business strategy, productivity and performance. The best-selling author of “The Second Machine Age” (2016) and “Machine, Platform, Crowd” (2017), he directs the MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy.

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SILICON VALLEY’S IMMORTALISTS WILL HELP US ALL STAY HEALTHY

In early 1954, Pope Pius XII summoned a venerable Swiss quack named Paul Niehans to the papal retreat at Castel Gandolfo. The pontiff was nauseated with gastritis, fatigued by his 77 years, and loath to meet his maker. So he had Niehans administer an anti­aging treatment called cell therapy, which would become sought after by midcentury celebrities, artists, and politicians.

Fetal cells were taken from a pregnant sheep and injected into the scrawny pope. Over time, Pius received a series of shots. The Holy Patient felt rejuvenated; Niehans was appointed to the Pontifical Academy of Sciences in thanks. But if the treatments worked at all, it wasn’t for long: Pius died four years later.

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