Anne-Marie Slaughter

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Authority on Global Affairs, the Geopolitics of COVID-19 and Gender Equality; CEO of New America; University Professor Emerita of Politics and International Affairs, Princeton

Biography

Anne-Marie Slaughter is the CEO of New America, a think ​and action ​tank dedicated to renewing the promise of America, bringing us closer to our nation’s highest ideals.

She is also the Bert G. Kerstetter ’66 University Professor Emerita of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University. From 2009–2011, she served as director of policy planning for the United States Department of State, the first woman to hold that position. Upon leaving the State Department she received the Secretary’s Distinguished Service Award for her work leading the Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review, as well as meritorious service awards from USAID and the Supreme Allied Commander for Europe. Prior to her government service, Dr. Slaughter was the Dean of Princeton University’s School of Public and International Affairs (formerly the Woodrow Wilson School) from 2002–2009 and the J. Sinclair Armstrong Professor of International, Foreign, and Comparative Law at Harvard Law School from 1994-2002.

Dr. Slaughter has written or edited eight​ books, including ​”The Chessboard and the Web: Strategies of Connection in a Networked World”(2017)​, “Unfinished Business: Women, Men, Work, Family” (2015), “The Idea That Is America: Keeping Faith with Our Values in a Dangerous World” (2007)​, and “​A New World Order” (2004), ​as well as over 100 scholarly articles. She was the convener and academic co-chair, with Professor John Ikenberry, of the Princeton Project on National Security, a multi-year research project aimed at developing a new, bipartisan national security strategy for the United States. In 2012 she published the article “Why Women Still Can’t Have It All,” in the Atlantic, which quickly became the most-read article in the history of the magazine and helped spawn a renewed national debate on the continued obstacles to genuine full male-female equality.

Dr. Slaughter is a contributing editor to the Financial Times and writes a bi-monthly column for Project Syndicate. She provides frequent commentary for both mainstream and new media and curates foreign policy news for over 140,000 followers on Twitter. Foreign Policy magazine named her to their annual list of the Top 100 Global Thinkers in 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012. She received a B.A. from Princeton, an M.Phil and D.Phil in international relations from Oxford, where she was a Daniel M. Sachs Scholar, and a J.D. from Harvard.

Anne-Marie Slaughter is available for paid speaking engagements – including virtual and in-person keynote speeches, panel discussions, interactive workshops and advisory/consulting services – through the exclusive representation of Stern Speakers, a division of Stern Strategy Group®.

Videos

Books & Research

The Chessboard and the Web: Strategies of Connection in a Networked World

(Yale University Press, March 2017)

Unfinished Business: Women Men Work Family

(Random House, September 2015)

A New World Order

(Princeton University Press, February 2009)

The Idea That Is America: Keeping Faith With Our Values in a Dangerous World

(Basic Books, August 2007)

Media

Tech Market Has Many Opportunities for Smaller Companies, Says New America

July 1, 2020

The hill logo

New America's Anne-Marie Slaughter says Countries Around World are Deciding Not to Trust US; All Eyes on New York as City Begins Phased Reopening

June 8, 2020

The Geopolitics of COVID-19: What Kind of World Should We Expect After the Crisis? (Audio)

May 14, 2020

Coronavirus Will Likely Change the Nature of U.S. Political Debate (Audio)

April 21, 2020

Forget the Trump Administration. America Will Save America

March 21, 2020

The Right to Be Seen

November 19, 2019

How Older Women are Trying to Change the World

November 7, 2019

Chronicle of Philanthropy logo

Anne-Marie Slaughter on Gender Equality, Transparency, and the Importance of Data (Audio)

October 11, 2019

CNN logo

We're Watching UK Self-Destruct (Video)

March 17, 2019

How an Article in The Atlantic "Transformed" Anne-Marie Slaughter's Life Trajectory

June 20, 2017

It's Critical to "Find Your Own Style" if You Want to Lead Successfully as a Woman, Says Anne-Marie Slaughter

June 19, 2017

The Atlantic logo

The Broken Promise of Higher Education

May 17, 2017

Why We Need Fewer "Tribes" and More Networks (Audio)

April 6, 2017

TIME Magazine logo

7 Questions with Anne-Marie Slaughter, CEO of New America

March 16, 2017

Anne-Marie Slaughter on Family, Career and What She Tells 25-Year-Olds

September 23, 2016

Washington Post logo

She Famously Said that Women Can't Have It All. Now She Realizes that No One Can

August 26, 2016

The Atlantic logo

The Work that Makes Work Possible

March 23, 2016

The Atlantic logo

The Failure of the Phrase "Work-Life Balance"

December 16, 2015

The Atlantic logo

The U.S. Economy Does Not Value Caregivers

January 9, 2014

Washington Post logo

Anne-Marie Slaughter on the New America Foundation, Obligations and Bipartisanship

April 7, 2013

The Atlantic logo

Why Women Still Can’t Have It All

July/August 2012

A-Z Name

Slaughter, Anne-Marie

Biography

Anne-Marie Slaughter is the CEO of New America, a think ​and action ​tank dedicated to renewing the promise of America, bringing us closer to our nation’s highest ideals.

She is also the Bert G. Kerstetter ’66 University Professor Emerita of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University. From 2009–2011, she served as director of policy planning for the United States Department of State, the first woman to hold that position. Upon leaving the State Department she received the Secretary’s Distinguished Service Award for her work leading the Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review, as well as meritorious service awards from USAID and the Supreme Allied Commander for Europe. Prior to her government service, Dr. Slaughter was the Dean of Princeton University’s School of Public and International Affairs (formerly the Woodrow Wilson School) from 2002–2009 and the J. Sinclair Armstrong Professor of International, Foreign, and Comparative Law at Harvard Law School from 1994-2002.

Dr. Slaughter has written or edited eight​ books, including ​”The Chessboard and the Web: Strategies of Connection in a Networked World”(2017)​, “Unfinished Business: Women, Men, Work, Family” (2015), “The Idea That Is America: Keeping Faith with Our Values in a Dangerous World” (2007)​, and “​A New World Order” (2004), ​as well as over 100 scholarly articles. She was the convener and academic co-chair, with Professor John Ikenberry, of the Princeton Project on National Security, a multi-year research project aimed at developing a new, bipartisan national security strategy for the United States. In 2012 she published the article “Why Women Still Can’t Have It All,” in the Atlantic, which quickly became the most-read article in the history of the magazine and helped spawn a renewed national debate on the continued obstacles to genuine full male-female equality.

Dr. Slaughter is a contributing editor to the Financial Times and writes a bi-monthly column for Project Syndicate. She provides frequent commentary for both mainstream and new media and curates foreign policy news for over 140,000 followers on Twitter. Foreign Policy magazine named her to their annual list of the Top 100 Global Thinkers in 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012. She received a B.A. from Princeton, an M.Phil and D.Phil in international relations from Oxford, where she was a Daniel M. Sachs Scholar, and a J.D. from Harvard.

Anne-Marie Slaughter is available for paid speaking engagements – including virtual and in-person keynote speeches, panel discussions, interactive workshops and advisory/consulting services – through the exclusive representation of Stern Speakers, a division of Stern Strategy Group®.

Speech Topics

Renewing the Promise of America

The United States has made progress over several centuries through a combination of radical honesty about our failures and renewed commitment to our founding ideals. Today we are once again facing our past and present with a new awareness of how many Americans are systematically denied their equal rights to life, liberty, and opportunity. But as we approach the 250th Anniversary of our founding in 2026, we have a historic chance to renew and reinvent the ways we live, work, learn, care, govern ourselves and engage with the world. This talk draws on Anne-Marie Slaughter’s 2007 book “The Idea That Is America,” on her work as the CEO of New America, and her forthcoming book on renewal, offering a realistic perspective on our past and an attainable vision of our future.

The Future of Work

Most analyses of the future of work focus on how many jobs will be automated or simply disappear as a function of current and future waves of new technology, particularly robotics and AI. In this talk, Anne-Marie Slaughter steps back and asks some bigger questions about who will be working, what will we be doing, and where will we be doing it. On the who, humans will be working together with machines in ways that we cannot yet imagine. The who will also be a workforce that reflects the new America, from the mailroom to the boardroom, both because we must build a new prosperity that is genuinely inclusive and because we cannot afford to leave that much talent on the table.  The who will also include many older workers, women reentering or ramping up in the workforce at 50 or 55 and working until 70 or later; men who will move to project-based work rather than retiring. On the what, we will see a new generation of professional and semi-professional jobs. We are already seeing the disaggregation of current professions, like law and medicine, with a host of new high-skill support jobs being created, as well as entire new categories of care jobs where care is defined as investing in the performance of others: coaching, navigating, mentoring, advising, guiding, and teaching. We will also see major job creation in both new kinds of craft, aided by 3D printing, and in the circular economy. On the where, we will be working at home and in the office, in big cities and smaller communities, locally and globally, all at the same time. We are finally making the long-predicted shift away from the factories and offices created in the Industrial Age, creating a host of new opportunities but also a whole new set of management challenges. This talk is based on her experience as co-chair of the Shift Commission on Work, Workers and Technology with Roy Bahat, head of Bloomberg Beta, which New America has built into an entire body of work.

A New Global Order

It is really inconceivable that the world of 2045 will be run by the same countries and under the same institutional arrangements as in 1945. The post-World War II global order has been under strain for decades; the current combination of a global pandemic, a looming planetary crisis and the return (over-hyped, but still) of great power competition is just accelerating its demise, evolution or transformation. There will be no new San Francisco conference, however, in which the world’s most powerful nations dictate the terms for everyone else. The new global order will be brought into existence through a messy combination of actions and decisions taken by state and non-state actors, with a critical role for philanthropists, activist CEOs, civic leaders, investors and anyone else with the vision and means to create a hub of global activity and impact. There is no global steering committee; all of us must be able to imagine it in various forms to help bring it about.

What Gender Equality Will Really Take

To achieve real gender equality we will need to change what men do and what they are socially and economically rewarded for doing as much as we have changed the roles and perceptions of women, a process that is ongoing. Men must be as engaged and responsible at home as women are in the office, not as “helpers” but as principals. We must have the same expectations — high or low — of domestic competence of a father as of a mother. This next round of gender-bending will require as much work from women as from men, as women’s expectations often lock men into their current roles as the expectations of other men do. Women must also combat our own sexism in this regard, as we frequently assume that men really cannot manage at home as well as we can. We must also look hard at stereotypes of male and female attractiveness. And we must use public policy to create an entire infrastructure of care: gender-neutral systems of childcare, eldercare, paid family leave, and other supports for caregivers. The bottom line is that gender equality cannot be achieved only by changing the roles of women, and that creating a generation of “super-women” who manage to do it all simply obscures the deep and continuing gender divide.

 

 

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