Dan Ariely

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World-Renowned Behavioral Economist; Top 50 Most Influential Thinkers (Bloomberg); Professor of Psychology & Behavioral Economics, Duke University; Three-time New York Times Best-selling Author, “Amazing Decisions” (2019)

Biography

Despite our intentions, why do we so often fail to act in our own best interest? Why do we promise to skip the chocolate cake, only to find ourselves drooling our way into temptation when the dessert tray rolls around? Why do we overvalue things that we’ve worked so hard to create? What are the forces that influence our behavior? Dan Ariely, James B. Duke Professor of Psychology & Behavioral Economics at Duke University, is dedicated to answering these questions and others in order to help people live more sensible – if not rational – lives. His interests span a wide range of behaviors, and his sometimes unusual experiments are consistently interesting, amusing and informative, demonstrating profound ideas that fly in the face of common wisdom.

Ariely is a founding member of the Center for Advanced Hindsight, co-creator of the film documentary “(Dis)Honesty: The Truth About Lies,” and a three-time New York Times best-selling author. His books include “Predictably Irrational,” “The Upside of Irrationality,” “The Honest Truth About Dishonesty,” “Irrationally Yours,” “Payoff,” “Dollars and Sense” and “Amazing Decisions.”

In 2013, Bloomberg recognized Ariely as one of Top 50 Most Influential thinkers. He also has a bi-weekly advice column in the Wall Street Journal called “Ask Ariely.”

Dan Ariely is available for paid speaking engagements, including keynote addresses, speeches, panels, and conference talks, and advisory/consulting services, through the exclusive representation of Stern Speakers, a division of Stern Strategy Group®.

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Ariely, Dan

Biography

Despite our intentions, why do we so often fail to act in our own best interest? Why do we promise to skip the chocolate cake, only to find ourselves drooling our way into temptation when the dessert tray rolls around? Why do we overvalue things that we’ve worked so hard to create? What are the forces that influence our behavior? Dan Ariely, James B. Duke Professor of Psychology & Behavioral Economics at Duke University, is dedicated to answering these questions and others in order to help people live more sensible – if not rational – lives. His interests span a wide range of behaviors, and his sometimes unusual experiments are consistently interesting, amusing and informative, demonstrating profound ideas that fly in the face of common wisdom.

Ariely is a founding member of the Center for Advanced Hindsight, co-creator of the film documentary “(Dis)Honesty: The Truth About Lies,” and a three-time New York Times best-selling author. His books include “Predictably Irrational,” “The Upside of Irrationality,” “The Honest Truth About Dishonesty,” “Irrationally Yours,” “Payoff,” “Dollars and Sense” and “Amazing Decisions.”

In 2013, Bloomberg recognized Ariely as one of Top 50 Most Influential thinkers. He also has a bi-weekly advice column in the Wall Street Journal called “Ask Ariely.”

Dan Ariely is available for paid speaking engagements, including keynote addresses, speeches, panels, and conference talks, and advisory/consulting services, through the exclusive representation of Stern Speakers, a division of Stern Strategy Group®.

Speech Topics

Changing Behavior Using Behavioral Economics

Dan Ariely discusses some of the challenges (and some of the benefits) of our irrationalities as they play out day-to-day in both the workplace and in our personal lives. Topics include why it is so hard for us to make good decisions, the role of emotions, and how we can make decisions that are in our best long-term interest. Attendees will learn how to modify their current offering to better enable customers to make the right choices for themselves.

How Trust Works and What Can We Do to Increase It?

We rarely see trust, but the reality is that societies with higher trust perform much better and societies without trust have lower performance and GDP. The same is true for companies and relationships. In this talk Dan Ariely explains what trust is all about, how valuable it is as a social good, how easily it can be broken, and what we can do to keep it and build it up.

Designing Better Products Using Behavioral Economics

The principles of behavioral economics can help us better understand some of the irrationalities that influence our behaviors as consumers. These irrationalities include the choices we make among products, how we decide what we are willing to pay, the effects of expectations on our decisions, and the factors that cause us to gain and lose trust. In addition to covering these principles, Dan Ariely illustrates how to the use them to build products more compatible with our human nature and therefore more likely to give us our desired outcome.

How We Use, Misuse and Make Mistakes About Money

Dan Ariely discusses how we should deal with money and how we actually deal with money including the mistakes we make when we spend and save. Topics include why we have such a hard time thinking about money, the role of relativity when we make financial decisions, how different payment modalities change how we spend, and how to improve our approach to money.

Dishonesty: The Amazing Dance of Acting Badly But Still Thinking of Ourselves as Basically Good

One of the most interesting aspects of human behavior is the capacity to think of ourselves as honest even when we act dishonestly. In this talk, Dan Ariely addresses how the principles of behavioral economics can help us understand some of the irrational tendencies behind dishonest behavior. The implications of this research are far reaching and include a better understanding of financial crises, regulations, the potential pitfalls that we should all worry about, and day-to-day misbehaviors.

How to Get Better Health Using Behavioral Economics

One of the challenges we face when we try to improve our health is that what is good for us right now is often not what is good for us in the long term. Dieting, for example, is not so much fun now, but good for the future; the same can be said for medical tests, procrastination, even saving money. When we face such tradeoffs, we often focus on the short term rather than our long-term goals, and in the process get ourselves into trouble. But wait! There is hope. In this talk, Dan Ariely describes multiple experiments that help us understand where and why we fall short, and more importantly, how we can use this knowledge to develop methods that will ultimately help us overcome our natural (and less than desirable) inclinations when it comes to our decisions.

Understanding Our Relationship to Pricing

In this talk, Dan Ariely discusses how the principles of behavioral economics can help us understand some of the irrationalities that influence our reactions to pricing. What is the role of MSRP on the perception of price? What makes a price feel fair? How do our past purchases affect our later purchases? And, more generally, what makes us willing to pay more for some things yet view others as too expensive?

The Facts We Know, Don’t Know, and Think We Know About What It Takes to Motivate People

There is no question that understanding human motivation is important to anyone who runs a team or a company. Yet the forces that motivate people are not always clear and easy to understand. In this talk, Dan Ariely describes some experiments on what motivates us in the workplace and in our personal lives. These experiments show what we often think of as motivators don’t always motivate us. And what we think doesn’t matter sometimes ends up being very important.  By the end of this talk, attendees will be armed with a new framework for modifying their current approach to be better at motivating those around us.

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Recommendations

Praise for “Irrationally Yours”

“Dan is the most provocative, interesting, and to-the-point advice columnist you are likely to read, whether on your job, your love life, your kids or your disrespectful neighbors.”

— Tyler Cowen, Holbert L. Harris Professor of Economics at George Mason University, Author of Average Is Over, Blogger at marginalrevolution.com

“Ariely is a master observer of human foibles. His advice is funny, thoughtful, and well-founded. Sometimes all three together. My advice: read it, enjoy it, think about it.”

— Al Roth, Craig & Susan McCaw Professor of Economics at Stanford University, Nobel Laureate in Economics

“From advice on relationships to insight on superstitions, Ask Ariely is as informative as it is witty. Really enjoyed reading it.”

— Dr. Ruth K. Westheimer, Sex Therapist

“With 70% of his body burned, 3 years in hospital, and decades of experiments in social science, Dan views life from a unique perspective. In this thoroughly entertaining book Dan providing insightful advice to a vast range of human problems. I loved it.”

— Terry Jones, Monty Python member, director, actor and writer

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